Extracts from Parish Magazine for August 2001
Birthday Congratulations
Accommodation for Youth Leader
What we need for the New-to-You Sale on 15th September
Cathedral Link
Congratulations to
Taken from the Chester Chronicle of 8th June 1901
“Heathfield” Coffee Morning (9th June)
Bellringers Descend on Derbyshire
W I News
WANTED
Mothers’ Union
Christleton revisited
Visit of Ian & Clare Gray to St James’
Congratulations to Nicholas and Rowena Lee on their marriage
Millennium Window
Wildlife News
Missionary link letter from Susan Gumbrell
Visit of Ian & Clare Gray to St James’
Christleton Youths & Junior Football Club Prizegiving Evening
Christleton Cricket Club
Map Story 29 – Betty’s Map
Birthday Congratulations
Joan Rocke of Tarvin Road, Littleton will be celebrating her 90th birthday on August 10th. Joan was born in 1911, one of five children of John William Ivory and Florence Nightingale Ivory. Her mother’s grandfather, Benjamin Delacour, was a painter who had fled France to live in London to escape the Huguenot persecutions. His daughter, Isobel, Joan’s grandmother, married a Walter Smith and moved to the United States of America where Walter founded the first US teaching Art School in Boston, Massachusetts.
When Joan’s mother Florence Nightingale Smith was 18, the family returned from the USA to settle in Grassington in Yorkshire, where she met and married John William Ivory. John worked for a firm of oil merchants in Liverpool, where he rose from office-boy to Managing Director.
Joan inherited her great-grandfather’s artistic flair and her father’s drive and ambition, combining them to good effect in the many facets of her eventful, varied and colourful life.
Joan Rocke has written many short articles, mainly about antiques and local history for The Deesider, The Daleman, Yorkshire Illustrated, Cheshire Life and more recently for the Wirral Journal. Her first book, A Wirral Childhood, was written in 1993 at the age of 82, her second, the autobiographical A Cheshire Girl, at the age of 86. Her third book, Many Happy Returns, was published in 2000 and reminisces about the many pleasant things that have disappeared from Wirral and Chester. Last month she featured in Cheshire Life as a ‘Woman of the Year’ nominee. She is now thinking of what she can do next and we wish her many happy returns!
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Accommodation for Youth Leader
At the PCC meeting on 9th July it was agreed that the PCC should sponsor a student youth leader. This could result in a requirement to provide accommodation for the student during the coming academic year. Accommodation would need to be large enough for a desk and a computer. It could be part of shared accommodation or a flat. If anyone knows of any suitable accommodation, please contact Nigel Seddon (335588) or John Carruthers (01829 740810).
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What we need for the New-to-You Sale on 15th September

Books
Tapes
Bric-a-brac
Good quality clothing
Raffle prizes
Refreshments

NO jumble or electrical goods please.
Help is also required, particularly volunteers to drop off any surplus at charity shops.

Goods can be left at the Parish Hall on Friday 14th September in the afternoon 2 – 4 pm or Friday evening 7 – 9 pm.
Contacts:
Clothing Cynthia Siddall (335486)
Bric-a-brac Moira Jones (336204)
Other Margaret Croston (335955)
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Cathedral Link
A stained glass window has been installed in the Refectory at the Cathedral. It was designed and made by Rosalind Grimshaw, a designer based in Bristol. A project for the Millennium and made possible by the generosity of local sponsors. Each of the upper lights (panels) represents one of the six days of creation. So there is darkness and light, land and water (a river estuary), grasses and fruit, planets in outer space, fish, fowl, sea monsters and animals, and finally human beings. The lower panels have a mostly scientific connection and show the possible future of the subjects and images in the upper lights. There are representations of skyscrapers at night, oceans as they appear through the Hubble telescope, a butterfly egg, a water pump, the double helix of DNA, and, very movingly, a PET scan of Rosalind Grimshaw’s own brain (she suffers from Parkinson’s disease). Above and overarching the four centre lights is the dove – the Holy Spirit – and reaching over the whole window is the Hand of God – creating and blessing. These images are made of prismatic glass to refract and reflect light into the Refectory beneath. In the words of the designer, “ I have tried to show the continuous miracle of creation in its variety and richness and the miracle of the sun rising every morning.”

Stephen S. Smalley, Dean of Chester from 1987 to 2001, retired in July, one of his last public duties being the dedication of the new stained glass window in the Refectory.
The list of additions and changes to the fabric of the Cathedral in his time has been most significant. Amongst them are the sculpture The Water of Life in the cloister garden executed by Stephen Broadbent, Joseph Pyrz’s carving of St Werburgh and Harold Gosney’s Virgin and Child in the Lady Chapel. The Undercroft has been cleared and restored, the Visitors’ Entrance opened, the Cathedral Shop re-created and embroidered kneelers placed throughout the cathedral. In addition, a new altar frontal was made for the high altar, new vestments and chairs have been obtained, the worn-out Nave floor replaced with the addition of under-floor heating, the roof cleaned, painted and gilded as well as the installation of lighting for the Nave platform, a closed circuit TV system, a state-of-the-art sound system and an induction loop for the hard of hearing.
Other projects started include the re-fitting of the current Library room and the construction of a new Song School (due to start in the Autumn).
The Dean would be quick to point out that all this has not been done by himself but with everyone, the Chapter, the Heads of Departments and their staffs and the hundreds of volunteers, working together as a team. His motto has been Continuity and Change. He always preached with a Bible in his hand and often spoke about the need for practising the same kind of hospitality now as that offered by the Benedictine monks when the building was an Abbey. The good wishes of all go with him in his retirement to the Cotswolds.

A service of farewell to Stephen Smalley took place on Sunday 15th July. St James’ PCC contributed towards his leaving present.
Margaret Croston

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Congratulations to
Tim and Dorothy Colley who celebrate their Golden Wedding Anniversary on 4th August 2001.

John and Joan Roberts who celebrate their Golden Wedding Anniversary on 11th August 2001.

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Taken from the Chester Chronicle of 8th June 1901
Joseph Mosford, a butcher from Christleton, was fined 10s and costs or 14 days’ imprisonment for furious driving, at not less than 12 or 15 mph, down Foregate Street and Boughton. He maintained that the horse could not go more than 10 mph whoever drove it! (With thanks to Chester History & Heritage News, Summer 2001 edition.)

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“Heathfield” Coffee Morning (9th June)
This was a happy event and very successful. Thank you to all those who helped and those who participated.
The total raised was over £1000 (details available) and the money will be distributed to Age Concern, Tools for Self Reliance, Amnesty and Wesley Handicapped Club.
Other who joined include Corrymeela, UNA Chester, Drop the Debt (formerly Jubilee 2000) and Peace Initiative, all of whom benefited.

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WANTED
For the Littleton Barn Children’s Project (Registered Charity No. 517124).
An electric cooker and a fridge/freezer. They should be in good working order and clean condition.
Please contact Shirley Earl (332210) or Barbara and Vincent Tonge (335059).
Bellringers Descend on Derbyshire

Our Summer tour this year was on 7 July to Derbyshire. To Ashford in the Water and Bakewell, to Edensor, Darley Dale and Edensor. We ranged in age from 10 to 70, were thirty two in number and were joined by the good people of Waverton and St Georges, Stockport. Our legendary navigation meant we arrived at the first tower from all four directions simultaneously.
At Ashford in the Water we broke a rope. At Bakewell we got wet and sampled the Bakewell Pudding – very different from the tart. At Edenesor we revelled in the fact that we rang for the Duke of Devonshire – well, he might have just been able to hear us from nearby Chatsworth.
At Darley Dale, in a field of a friend of a friend of a farmer, we had our traditional picnic of homemade cakes (and ale, which came later). Roy brewed his inimitable tea, Scouting style, whilst Andrew got very excited about the steam train we saw. We tried to fly kites but blamed the wind, threw Frisbees recklessly and even had synchronised juggling. Next, Youlgrave was notable for the pub with a full-blown chip shop in the snug.
Oh, and the ringing? The ringing was great. We rang things we hadn’t rung for ages, helped by our able visitors. We even rang things some of us had never rung before. A good time by all was had. However, if you ever talk to Michael Philips, ask him about the Cat and Fiddle.
Colin Harris
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W I News
The last meeting of the Summer was a social evening held on July 11th at the Parish Hall.
A Beetle drive was held. After the reports by the Secretary and the Treasurer, Joan Webb told us of her outing to the Presidents’ Day Meeting.
Mrs Edith Hough, the President of the Waverton Branch of the Women’s Institute, gave a report of what went on a the W I meeting in Cardiff, with some rather humorous comments.
The evening concluded with a most enjoyable supper of strawberries and cream with a glass of wine.
W Thompson
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Mothers’ Union
We have had two excellent speakers at Mothers’ Union recently.
Rena Griffiths gave a wonderful talk about Autism, showing us how love, dedication, determination and patience can help to develop skills in children and adults who would otherwise find it so hard to relate to others in a meaningful way.
In June, Jeanne, who is an expert on aromatheraphy and remedial massage, spoke about oils mentioned in the Bible and oils used now for healing and cosmetics, pointing out their similarities.
We were very say to lose Linda Elley from our group. Linda had been a very active member of Mothers’ Union – always bright and cheerful, practical and helpful and we will miss her very much.
Our Coffee Morning raised £174, from which we were able to send £70 to Save the Family. We were also pleased to be able to donate £100 to the Millennium window.
In July the Mothers’ Union from St Paul’s Helsby joined us for our tea party and about 20 members came. It was a lovely afternoon and we have been invited back to Helsby in September.
We do not meet in August, but at our next meeting in September, Wynn Bradley is coming to give a talk on the W I work in Romania.
Christleton revisited
During June I had the great pleasure of meeting Mr & Mrs Hill from Wimbledon and of taking them around our beautiful village. So what was so special about that you might ask? Well Mrs Hill was formerly Gillian Morgan, the daughter of Reg Morgan the village photographer from the early 1900s. We met after being put in touch by a mutual friend. She had no idea that her father had taken and published so many photographs of the village, and that we have built up a fine collection of them. Many were used in the publication Christleton 2000 Years of History, and several more of his photographs new to me, are on the walls of the “Cheshire Cat” Heritage Inn.
Mrs Hill also brought up photographs for me to see, and several are of interest. They include a photograph of The Garth in Windmill Lane being built for the family, a shot of the old Post Office Store on the corner of Windmill Lane & Pepper Street owned by the Morgans, and taken down and rebuilt around 1880, a Mrs Ravenscroft standing outside Rock House, and two prints of the old Newgate Street in Chester, one showing an advertisement for Jas Storrar, former Village Vet.
It was delightful to meet Mr & Mrs Hill and to be able to show them the work of her father, that I have collected. I am constantly amazed that new examples of his work still turn up from time to time, and yet from the numbers on the photographs I know that there must be even more examples out there in the village. I would be very pleased if I could borrow and copy any more of his work that might be in existence, to add to the village collection. The photographs all usually postcard size, have TRM and hand-written subtitles on them, and date from between 1905 and 1930. Please let me know if you are able to help. Thank you.
David Cummings
Congratulations to Nicholas and Rowena Lee on their marriage
The wedding took place on Saturday 9th June 2001 at the Church of St Martin and St Mary, Chudleigh in Devon, of Rowena Grace Boyd and Nicholas Peter Lee. It was a very happy occasion witnessed by a large number of family and friends. The service was led by the Reverend Paul Wimsett and the marriage ceremony taken by the Rector K Peter Lee. Lessons were read by Clare Lee and Euan Boyd, and music for the occasion was provided by The Harcombe Singers, conductor Peter Adcock, and violinist Marina Geldsetzer.
After a delightful champagne reception, the couple left for a honeymoon in Reunion.

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Millennium Window
I'm sure readers will be delighted to know that the appeal target of £13,000 is very now close. The figure has dramatically risen in the last few weeks and on 12th July is over £12,400. Thank you very sincerely to everyone who has contributed in any way. I know that you will be pleased when this beautiful window is put in place in the Lady Chapel. It will make a wonderful addition to our village heritage, and a great talking point for future generations. We hope to give further news of its construction in the very near future.

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Wildlife News
The swans at The Pit have managed to rear their two remaining cygnets, and both are looking healthy. The third, and largest surviving cygnet of the four born, was found dead of an unknown cause at The Pit in early June. As I explained last month, the birds are probably staying there because of the damage to the cob’s leg. The adults are also well into their annual moult stage now and cannot fly, so will stay at The Pit for security. The seven cygnets of the pair on the canal at Rowton remain very healthy, and are growing daily from their diet of grass and vegetation. Cygnets at this stage of their growth eat 4lbs of grass a day, and grow to adult size in four months!
Mink continue to thrive on the canal and I had a recent report of two moorhen chicks being taken by a mink near Toll Bar Road. Sparrow hawks continue to be a hazard for our small bird population and Beryl and I had a wonderful view of a male sitting on our garden gate for ten minutes earlier this week. He was so blasé I was even able to open the patio door to photograph him directly with a 400mm lens. Regrettably butterflies are few and far between this season so far, and only small tortoiseshell and red admirals have appeared in this area since the early season orange wing tips and speckled woods.
David Cummings

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Missionary link letter from Susan Gumbrell
In her latest letter, Susan talks a great deal about the problems of running a Convent Boarding School. Most of the 772 students have a home town or village within the state of Onitsha or one nearby. Their parents often work in Onitsha, Enugu, Sapele, Lagos Kano or even Cameroon. Every student is supposed to have a guardian within easy reach of the school, but sometimes the arrangements fall down. The extended family works well in most instances, but occasionally parents seem to almost abandon their daughters, and are unconcerned about their progress, health or well-being.
There have been problems with the introduction of new exams with cases of leaking papers, malpractice and cheating. Papers were inefficiently distributed and there were mistakes, missing results and understandardised marking. (Sounds familiar!) Some girls on a new course had 18 papers to sit over a two week period. Inevitably they cannot maintain concentration over that period of time, and many of the girls were very keen to “escape” from the school, straining for freedom, because of the intense pressure. They kept the staff and Susan on their toes during the whole of this time. The girls however do appreciate the time spent at the convent, because when they return for their certificates, they talk fondly about their time there.
The major problems with the generator continued for sometime after Susan’s last letter, but she is delighted to report that a new mechanic seems to have been able to solve the problem. They have also had a much improved input from the national power generator, and have had constant power on several evenings. “Thank the Lord!” However the mains water is as unreliable as ever. They now have a chemical/ filtration system at the bore hole which will treat the water and make it stop going brown overnight. The system was fitted in a week, but someone forget that water is heavy stuff, and the first time the big tank was filled, it sank, and some of the pipes broke. Since then they have built a concrete floor for the tank to stand on.
The new Chapel was dedicated last May, and it is now used for meetings, lessons, rehearsals, etc. Making pews for the chapel is an on going process, and several link churches have provided funds for these pews. The next project is for a dining/exam hall.
In early July 270 girls will be coming to take the second stage of the entrance exam, from which 160 will be selected. Soon the time for begging and pleading will arrive when mothers come, all saying that their daughter is very clever, was sick during the exam, will do much better if she were to be admitted. Susan says, “I’m getting better at saying NO, but it’s not easy.”
“The longer I am here the more I realise that it is in the anticipation of things that is worse than the actual event. There have been times when I’ve been dreading a conversation I know is necessary or a meeting I know I can’t avoid, or an event I don’t think has been prepared far enough or something which I know is inevitable but over which I have no control. Sometimes I have sleepless nights. But in every case these things are never as bad as I thought they’d be and I know it’s because my prayers and those of others, of yours, have been answered and God has smoothed the path. He has given me the right words to say, put helpers in the right place, and the whole stressful, uncomfortable situation fades away and everything falls into place. I need to trust God more and not procrastinate.”
“Please thank God for
* our improved electricity supply
* our continued safety
* my good health”
“Please pray for
* the class 6 students in their exams and as they leave.
* the new students entering the school next session
* the events of this term
* conscientiousness from all the staff
* the arrangements for my leave.”

Letter abridged by David Cummings

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Christleton Cricket Club
June was a good month for both teams. At the half way stage of the programme the 1st and 2nd teams are top of their leagues.
Eric Godwood achieved notable performances with centuries on successive weeks.
Ian Rule and Greg Malkin were selected for the league under 19’s team.
The ladies cricket team are also top of the Cheshire Women’s league.
Sponsors of match balls for June were:

Gordon Williams
Rowton Hall
Jim Partington
Mike Read
Bill Malkin
Brian Ruks.

We thank them for their generous support.

Why not visit us on our web site at – www.christletoncc.co.uk
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Christleton Youths & Junior Football Club Prizegiving Evening
The F A Cup comes to Christleton!
Trophies were presented to members of the Christleton Junior and Youth Football teams at the Christleton Football Club on Friday evening June 15th by Mr Rick Parry Chief Executive of Liverpool Football Club. Also on show amongst the fine display of Christleton’s awards was the most famous trophy in football, the F A Cup.
Individual awards presented to the Juniors, were to Joe Walley (Players’ Player of the Year) and Tom Wardman (Manager’s Player). Thanks are due to managers Kevin Mayhew and Steve Beddows for much hard work throughout a long and disrupted season.
The Youth team won several prestigious trophies including the Wirral Junior Cup. The Traynor Trophy for Wirral “Player of the Year” went to Robert Taberner, and the Wirral League “Secretary of the Year” was presented to Phil Ansonia. The team also reached the final of the Cheshire Youth Cup. Individual awards were presented by Rick Parry, to Mike Costello (Players’ Player), Ian Marsh (Manager’s Player), and Robert Taberner received the Andy Ellett Memorial Plate, presented by Chris and Val Ellett in memory of their much loved and missed son Andy. Special thanks were given to Peter Taberner, Phil Ansonia and Dave Cresswell for managing a fine team during the season and achieving such great success. Christleton Football Club were also thanked for their excellent support of Junior Football at Little Heath and for providing the facilities for the presentation evening. The evening ended with the Christleton players being photographed with the famous F A Cup.

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Visit of Ian & Clare Gray to St James’
Many of us were delighted to be able to meet Ian and Clare Grey at St James’ in June, as they brought personal thanks and news of our Village Millennium Gift to the Tampluma Community in Ghana. The portable generator we donated will provide a source of power for villagers in this remote community, which is reached only by canoe. They will be able to show films about health and education, as well as stories about Jesus and the Bible. It will also be used to provide hot water to enable eye operations to be carried out on young children. Almost every child in the community is born with one or two cataracts due to inbreeding within the community, but they can be removed at little cost if they can be taken to a clinic. At present this means a long journey, but thank to our gift it will become much easier to do locally.
Ian and Clare told us about their wonderful mission work over many years, and we were astounded to learn how they had written down phonetically the spoken language of the people, and by hard work and dedication, first of all providing hand-written reading books and then chapters of the Bible, brought a written language into being. The success of the work means that the majority of the community can now read, and through sponsorship and support of other communities, the Tampluma people now own their own Bibles in their mother tongue. These are kept in the mud huts, hung in canvas bags on a pole slung below the roof, in order that the termites can’t undo in a night all the good work that Ian, Clare and their helpers have done over many years. Their project is a great example of how Christian belief can be put into action.

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Map Story 29 – Betty’s Map
Three weeks ago a racing pigeon landed in my back yard. Her name is Betty and she appears to have a nervous quiver in her wings. Through tender loving care I have built up a good relationship with her. Feeding and watering and bringing her undercover in the afternoons and evenings. Each morning picking her up and taking her outside. She appears to be responding. Many years ago I bought for my own collection a Racing Pigeon Fanciers Map of the British Isles. It is mounted on linen with rollers and I would guess it would have been used by a fancier or pigeon club in the Edwardian era. This story was supposed to ponder the question as to whether I should show Betty the map and help her to get home or to offer her a new place to live. Unfortunately I found Betty had died when I returned on the evening of my birthday. On reflection I do not think I would ever really have wanted to show her the map.

Richard Nicholson