Extracts from Parish Magazine for October 2001
John Sellers Educational Foundation
Cathedral Link
Ode to Doreen
Poem - God of Bright colours
On Their Way in a New World
On Further Reconciliation
Mothers’ Union Meeting 10th September 2001
W. I. News
Christleton Local History Group.
Nature News - An Orchid Summer
Christleton Cricket Club
Photo of the Month.
The Winter Series of Charity Talks
Map Story No. 31 – Home is Where the Heart is

Click to enlarge
Birthday congratulations
Very many congratulations and birthday greetings to David Cummings who is 60 on 9th October.

John Sellers Educational Foundation
This ancient trust was founded on 23 December 1779 for the education of poor children in Christleton and Littleton. It was to provide instruction in reading, English, writing, arithmetic- and for spinning, sewing and knitting.
The original minute book is still in use - is this a record?
The sole income is from the rent of a field in Plough Lane. It is the intention of the present trustees (comprising the Rector, a Clerk, a County Council representative, two Parish Councillors) to try to increase the capital, so that interest can be given out to comply with the original intention. Each year grants are given, but they are not available to individuals. This year £125 each has been given to the Primary School for books for their new Library, and to the Under-Fives’ Group to purchase a construction set and a book to develop handwriting skills.
If any group wishes to apply, contact the Clerk to the John Sellers Foundation in writing at 5 Bridge Drive, Christleton, Chester CH3 6AW. The next meeting will take place in November.
Donations or legacies would be very much appreciated.

Cathedral Link
Pilgrim Days are here again from Monday 1st September to Saturday 6th October, excluding Thursday 4th October. Children start to arrive in the Cathedral at 9.45 am and go to the Nave after being welcomed and leaving their lunch boxes. As soon as there are enough children assembled, they start to learn a song and this continues until 10.20 am. Then the workshops start when they can have ‘hands-on’ experience of various crafts. All get a chance to become a Benedictine monk, dressed in the appropriate habit and hood, and they receive a monk’s breakfast in the Refectory whilst the “abbot” reads them a story, usually the Prodigal Son. During this time they are committed to a vow of silence. After lunch, which they take outside if possible or in the Cloisters if wet, they go to the South Transept for the ‘organ spot’. This is one of the highlights of the day. The Musical Director explains all about the organ and the Organist puts it through its paces, beginning with the tiniest noise up to the volume that almost shakes the building. The children’s faces are a picture. If you have time to pop into the Cathedral during this organ spot, which takes place 12.30 – 12.45 pm, you are in for a treat!

The Methodist Recorder of 30th August has a feature on “Handwriting the Bible”. Susan Hufton of Hove, Sussex, along with a team of other professional calligraphers, is producing a Bible using methods little changed from those of a medieval scriptorium. They are writing on vellum (calf skin) using goose quill pens and 100 year-old Chinese stick ink. They began writing in February last year (the Millennium year) and the whole project is due to be completed by March 2006. These traditional methods are still the best and coupled with modern conservation techniques, the St John’s Bible will last for many, many years. When it is completed, it will be in seven bound volumes with 1150 pages an 160 illuminations, two feet in height and almost three feet across when it is opened.

A Jubilee Man, made entirely from welded links of chain, was on show in the South aisle of the Cathedral during September. He was depicted reaching out to a silver tree of life, festooned with fruits on its branches. Two artists who live in Stoke-on-Trent created him to commemorate the release from debt of some of the third world countries.

Margaret Croston

Top

Ode to Doreen
May I highlight Alzheimer’s Disease, which is a terrible illness and just one type of dementia.
My wife Doreen was first diagnosed in 1997 when she could no longer do the simple things in life, not being able to make a cup of tea, forgetting where the bathroom was and not being able to read or concentrate on television.
I am not bitter. We had 53 years of happiness.
Doreen has now gone into residential care, and I know that I have already lost the girl I married, although not through death, so in effect I am having two bereavements.
I have written a little ode to Doreen. May God bless all those good people of Chester for giving so generously whenever we make a collection for the Alzheimer’s Society and all the people that have given me and my family support over the past four years. God bless them all.

Doreen had to go into residential care,
I thought it would be more than I could bear.
She’s been my best friend for 53 years
And I knew we would shed some tears.

Doreen’s being cared for now
And I miss her terribly.
Hollybank is now her home
But I wish she was here, with me.

Three times a week I visit Doreen.
Sometimes with a smile she greets me
And she’s happy, I can see,
As I put her arms around me.

I give her a hug
And wonder if she knows me.
As I hold her hands
She squeezes them tightly
And I know she understands.

Before I leave I tell her
“I love you”.
She’s tired now, she closes her eyes,
But mouths the words “I love you too”.
I write this with tears on my cheeks
And think what a blessing it was
That the two of us should meet.

James Murray


Poem
God of bright colours: rainbows, peacocks,
And the shot-silk gleam of springing
Wind-shaken wheat
on rolling red-ribbed Earth:
Thou who dost bring to birth
From out of the womb
Of darkness golden flowers,
Filling the hollows
With daffodils in March,
Cowslips in April,
Dog-roses in May;
Who in the smouldering forest
Makes the huge
Red flare of Autumn:
God of all the colours
On Earth, and hues (too bright for mortal eyes)
In Paradise
Unbind me to Thy Glory,
That I may see!

F W Harvey


Children’s Society Boxes
Attention all Box Holders!
Just a few weeks left before Box opening 2001. Please check next month’s parish magazine for details of our annual offertory service.
Many thanks.
Lesley Morgan
Top



Rededication Service at St. James on 9th September, 2001

On Their Way in a New World
Unterwegs in eine neue Welt
Simultaneously with the Rededication Service at St James’, I was privileged to attend a special Mass at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Fulda in Germany.
Established by St Boniface in 744 AD after his pilgrimage from Devon, the Cathedral was on 9th September an appropriate setting for a Family Communion attended by many young people during which we prayed for God’s blessing on them “Unterwegs in eine neue Welt” (On their way in a new world).
Appropriate too that several pupils from Christleton High School, now in their mid-twenties and early thirties, went with me and other leaders on the Cheshire Youth Exchange to Fulda and were themselves stimulated and encouraged “on their way”.
John Carruthers
Mothers’ Union Meeting 10th September 2001
We need ideas for our new project for the November meeting. This year it has been Save the Family and we could continue with this.
Save the Family have got a grant to refurbish the big house at Plas Bellin, and they have enough equipment until December, although they still need stocking fillers for Christmas.
Home and Family subs are due and money needs to be collected in October for the diaries and calendars.
Jeanne read out a letter from Edna Bebbington thanking us for our support when she sadly lost her dear husband Albert after 62 years of marriage.
Len Morgan kindly agreed to give us one of his many wonderful talks entitled ‘A Look back at Chester Past’. The photographs were brilliant, and the talk was about the churches and parishes within the City walls and how they had altered during the past years.
On Wednesday 12th September we were invited to Helsby by our link Mothers’ Union, which is St Paul’s. We had communion together in St Paul’s Church, which is a lovely church, and then went to the Parish Hall for an enormous tea that the Mothers’ Union had made for us. It was absolutely delicious, and we are very happy to be linked with such a friendly and welcoming group.
We have got another good speaker for our meeting on 8th October. Mrs Wynne Bradley will be talking to us about the work of the W. I. in Romania. Mrs Bradley has just returned from a trip to Romania, so we should have some up-to-date news. We hope that W. I. members will be able to come and anyone else who is interested.

W. I. News
As the President was away, the September meeting of the W. I. was taken by Joan Webb. After reports by the temporary Secretary, the Treasurer and the Sports representative, it was an evening of nostalgic music and some very humorous poems by Joan and some of the members. This enjoyable evening ended with tea and home-made cakes.
W. Thompson

On Further Reconciliation
Dresden, 12th September 2001
Just before I came to Dresden for my second visit early last year, I wrote “On Reconciliation”. It was a God-given privilege on that occasion to share in the anniversary of the 1945 bombing and in the presentation from British people of the Orb and Cross for the top of the Frauenkirche, which is currently being rebuilt and due for completion in 2005.
My visit this time was intended to be expand my growing relationships with the people and establishments in this friendly place. As a geographer, I also wished to learn visually more about the beautiful houses and mansions in Dresden beyond the bombed area and to witness their steady and painstaking refurbishment from years of relative neglect. This has been, and is, a most beautiful city.
The magical moments of my visit, such as the moving and exciting performance of Mozart’s The Magic Flute in the reconstructed Semper Opera House two nights ago and my walk along the peaceful river Elbe and crossing by the small ferry to the Palace of Pillnitz yesterday, had not prepared me for the catastrophic news from the United States in the evening.
Everyone was dumbfounded, from the young people, whose lives are slowly becoming more prosperous here, who were glued in shock to the radio and TV, to the Dresdeners old enough to remember the 1945 devastation who were queuing in the light morning rain for the trams, and to myself and the small group international group from the Goethe Institute who were going to the Palace of Moritzburg and for a country walk and were determined to share some beauty together.
To see the flags at half-mast in Dresden, some of which were by the last residues of the ruined buildings from 1945, was terribly moving.
Reconciliation for each Christian starts in our own road, continues on the bus, and evolves in our relationships at school, at work or at the shops, and in the way we speak to people. Jesus Christ sustains all our efforts with His love. Each of us counts.
“Thank you for coming” is a frequently said phrase in Dresden, as it was to me in Northern Ireland last month. We thank God for coming, with the love of Jesus Christ, into each of our lives, and upholding every gesture of reconciliation.

John Carruthers

Christleton Local History Group.
The Group cordially invites you to join them for their meetings
in the new term. Membership Fee. Individuals £8. Couples £14per annum. Meetings £2. Indoor meetings are held at the Primary School in Quarry Lane and talks given by a variety of speakers.
The next meeting is on Wednesday 31st October at 7.30pm
Topic. Ancient Greece.

Photo of the Month.
This is a copy of an original lithograph, drawn by the artist T Bailey, and shows St James' with the nave and chancel of the Georgian style church rebuilt in 1737. The main feature of interest is the appearance of a west door!, or possibly an elaborate window with rather fine tracery. The tower is clearly the original one dating from the 15thC, but with a different access to the bell chamber than at present. It is also worth noting that there are no signs of yew trees around the church. This might be due to artistic licence, as is the absence of any sign of the John Sellers Charity School (1779), which was situated in the churchyard, and should appear on the left side of the sketch. Richard Nicholson our webmaster searched an Internet site which gave us the information that T Bailey was an artist working in Chester between the years 1825-1840, so the print would almost certainly be from that period, possibly produced for the centenary of the new church buildings in 1837? As far as we are aware the print does not appear in any book about Chester from that period, and is the only copy we've seen. It was once in the possession of the old Rector, Revd. Guest Williams, and we are indebted to his former housekeeper Miss Hughes who has given the print to the Village.

The Winter Series of Charity Talks.
The talks series will continue again this winter with a variety of talks of interest, aimed at raising money for local causes. The first of these is to provide funds to replace the garden seat, stolen by thieves earlier this year from outside the Dixons Alms Houses. It was originally provided by the Christleton Guide Company for the residents, and the replacement seat is going to be secured to a concrete base constructed by the Pit Group.
The talks are held in the Parish Hall, at 7.30pm on the dates stated, except for the 26th January which will be an extended talk about Christleton, and will include a buffet supper. That talk commences at 7.00pm.
Friday 26th October.
The Norwegian Fjords & The Land of the Midnight Sun.
Friday 30th November.
Ancient Greece & The Greek Islands.(Crete & Corfu.)
Saturday 26th January 2002(With buffet supper)
A Celebration of Christleton. ( History, People, & Wildlife.)
Friday 15th February
A Celebration of Wales.(From the Bronze Age to the present day.)
Saturday 16th February
The Lake District.
Talk & Buffet Supper for Ellesmere Port Music Society.
Friday 22nd March
Wildlife in Close Up 2. (Insects, Flowers, Birds.)

Mothers’ Union Meeting 10th September 2001
We need ideas for our new project for the November meeting. This year it has been Save the Family and we could continue with this.
Save the Family have got a grant to refurbish the big house at Plas Bellin, and they have enough equipment until December, although they still need stocking fillers for Christmas.
Home and Family subs are due and money needs to be collected in October for the diaries and calendars.
Jeanne read out a letter from Edna Bebbington thanking us for our support when she sadly lost her dear husband Albert after 62 years of marriage.
Len Morgan kindly agreed to give us one of his many wonderful talks entitled ‘A Look back at Chester Past’. The photographs were brilliant, and the talk was about the churches and parishes within the City walls and how they had altered during the past years.
On Wednesday 12th September we were invited to Helsby by our link Mothers’ Union, which is St Paul’s. We had communion together in St Paul’s Church, which is a lovely church, and then went to the Parish Hall for an enormous tea that the Mothers’ Union had made for us. It was absolutely delicious, and we are very happy to be linked with such a friendly and welcoming group.
We have got another good speaker for our meeting on 8th October. Mrs Wynne Bradley will be talking to us about the work of the W. I. in Romania. Mrs Bradley has just returned from a trip to Romania, so we should have some up-to-date news. We hope that W. I. members will be able to come and anyone else who is interested.

Nature News - An Orchid Summer.
Orchids are one of the most beautiful flowering plants with over 18,000 species worldwide, with 50 or so of these appearing in the British Isles. Having never been on holiday in June before (the main flowering period), Beryl & I were amazed by the number of species and the large number of flowers that we found this year. I hadn't realised that there were still places where thousands of specimens could be seen at one time, in a variety of different habitats. My search started in Pembrokeshire in June with early purple, heath and marsh orchids. Next came the sight of a magnificent creamy white butterfly orchid, together with thousands of deep purple coloured southern and western marsh orchids in Devon. The heavy flooding of the winter months followed by a warm dry spring seems to have given these flowers added colour and size this year.
We then came across a small number of delightfully patterned bee orchids in a wildflower meadow in Avon. These so carefully mimicked the shape and size of a bee that it was difficult to realise that they were indeed delicate flowers and not insects. The most numerous of the species we saw were thousands of pink pyramidal orchids on the chalk downs of the Isle of Wight. There were also hundreds of purple common spotted orchids, whose name derives from the large number of dots or splodges on their tall green leaves. This variety has great variation in colour and size, from deep purple to creamy white with some flower spikes being up to (45cm) or 18inches tall, and together with the stalk bringing them up to almost (90cm) or 3 feet in height.

All orchids depend on the presence of a fungus growing inside their cells, to provide them with food for part of their lives. A process called symbiosis. No orchid seed can grow without first being infected with the fungus. The pollination of each plant is also a mysterious process, with two main forms; self pollination as in the case of a bee orchid, or cross pollination by an insect such as a butterfly, moth or bee. The bee orchid which resembles the abdomen of a bumble bee, really is a great deceiver, as it cannot provide nectar for any visitor, and it self pollinates with the help of the wind blowing the stigmas in front of the pollina. Two other unusual orchids are the tiny frog orchid, whose flowers resemble the shape of a frog, and the birds nest orchid which appears to be a collection of roots and rhizomes resembling a mass of sticks with virtually no colour at all. All these orchids can be seen in my slide presentation "Wildlife in Close Up 2" at the Parish Hall in March.
David Cummings.

Top

Christleton Cricket Club
Christleton Cricket Club ended the season in style. On Saturday both the 1st and 2nd teams won their respective Mellor Braggins leagues on and will play in the Cheshire County league for the first time in the 2002 season. It is hoped to enter three teams and the club will welcome new players next year.
Gareth Davies has seen much improvement during the last three years of his chairmanship.
Jim Gilson has proved to be an inspirational captain who has shaped together a formidable 1st team.
The second team have a mix of youth and experience under Wil Lamb.
The ground and standard of cricket is at its peak and Gordon Williams can be justly proud of what he started in 1973.
Thanks to the following for sponsoring matches during July, August and September:
Bob Lewis, David Cummins, Ring – O – Bells, Pete Mitchell, Martin Wheeler, Derek and Alun Garner, Simon Watt-Smith, Dennis Reeves, Ernie Bradshaw, Pizza Guy and Roy Fisher.

Scorer, Harry Graves is busy researching the history of Christleton Cricket Club and would welcome any old photographs or documents.

Further information on the internet at:
www.christletoncc.co.uk
or contact Brian Wareing on Chester 332326

Top

Map Story No. 31 – Home is Where the Heart is

Our Rector the Reverend Peter Lee has spent a number of holidays over the past few years on islands round the coast of Britain. This year he and his wife Fiona had an enjoyable two weeks on the Shetland Islands. Fiona was able to do some interesting family research. Her paternal great-grandmother (Henderson) came from the island of Yell and the house where she lived is still standing and still inhabited, no less, by a very vague relative.
I had a very welcome surprise last month when a lady who used to work for me many years ago at my shop in Watergate Street to say she was back in Chester for a short visit. Her name is Barbara and she used to live in Green Lane, Vicars Cross. I know that some of you reading this will remember her. She moved in the early 90’s to go and live on the island of Islay with her husband Douglas. When she visited Stoneydale the conversation just carried on from where we left off sixteen years ago. Her ability to tell a good story has not diminished and she had me enthralled with a tale about how she passed her driving test the first time on the island even though she did not agree to meet the examiner in the harbour pub that night.
It seems that being an Islay incomer from England she will always be known as a ‘White Settler’. Had she come over from Scotland she would have merely been an ‘Incomer’. After returning home she heard that three neighbours, the nearest being one mile away had been to her house whilst she had been away as they were concerned that they had not seen her or any activity around the house. I think the gesture touched her and I suggested that perhaps she was now a “Pearly White Settler”.
The Isle of Man has some interesting terms for its immigrants. Visitors from the mainland are known as ‘Come Overs’. If you stay a while you are a ‘Stop Over’ and after you depart you are a ‘Left Over’.
Some people move from one place to another from choice or very often necessity linked to their work. I have been living in Christleton for 24 years now but previous to that my longest stay in any one place was 7 years and sometimes only 1 year in my perambulation round 9 schools. I cannot say on reflection that it was what I would have personally chosen.
I know a person who was born in Christleton, left and then returned later in life to live in the village. My love of our village makes me quite jealous. If home is where the heart is then my heart is in Christleton.

Richard Nicholson

Top

LEPROSY MISSION
Stamp out leprosy!
Please donate your used stamps so that money can be raised for Leprosy Mission. Stamps should be trimmed to quarter inch border around the stamp, and can be left at the back of Church.

PLEASE TELL US…
If you know of any special birthdays, anniversaries or anyone celebrating a special occasion, who is a Parish Magazine reader, please inform the editor, David Bull.

AVAILABLE AT ST JAMES CHURCH:
“Loop” system, for the hearing impaired
Large print books for the visually impaired & large print weekly notice sheets
Easy to follow Communion Service Books for children
Access for wheelchairs
Please ask any of the Churchwardens or Sidesmen if you need assistance in any way.

NATIONAL CHILDBIRTH TRUST (N.C.T.) OPEN HOUSE GROUP:
Informal coffee mornings are held locally offering support to mums-to-be and families with young children (whether members or not) in a friendly, informal way. Please contact your local organiser Debbie Tel. 332103 for further details.

CHRISTLETON LOCAL HISTORY GROUP
Books for Sale
Christleton 2000 years of History.
136 pages of text, fully illustrated with b&w photographs, maps & drawings,
and including 8 pages of colour photographs. Laminated cover with water-colour
painting of the Church & Pump House by Phil Hodges.
£12.50 & (£2.75 postage & packing.) Free delivery locally.
Christleton Village Trail
A self guided tour of the Village in aid of the "Well for Africa" Appeal.
£2.50. (+30p postage& packing))
From David Cummings, 25 Croft Close, Rowton, Chester CH3 7QQ
or from Christleton Post Office.

CHRISTLETON UNDER-FIVES COMMUNITY PLAYGROUP
Registered charity 1022817
Christleton Under-Fives is an established pre-school playgroup attracting children from a wide area. It enjoys good and well-founded links with Christleton Primary School.
Children from the age of 2_ years until school entry age are accepted.
Please contact the Supervisor, Carole Penney, on 336586 for further details.

MOBILE LIBRARY VAN SERVICE
The van calls fortnightly: for details of when the van is next in your area, please telephone Upton Library on 380053.

READERS
Please remember to support our magazine advertisers and mention where you have read their name.

Top